Question

Most computer systems, on the other hand, use fewer layers than the OSI model needs. Why not use fewer layers? What are ...


Most computer systems, on the other hand, use fewer layers than the OSI model needs. Why not use fewer layers? What are the potential drawbacks of employing fewer layers?

Answer

The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model specifies how communication should be carried out, while the TCP/IP protocols provide the standards upon which the Internet was built.

TCP/IP, on the other hand, is a more realistic paradigm.

The model was created first to create the OSI model, and then the protocols for each layer were created.

 

 

Explanation:

The OSI model has seven levels, which are as follows: the Physical Layer, the Data Link Layer, the Network Layer, the Transport Layer, the Session Layer, the Presentation Layer, and the Application Layer.

The Physical Layer is the lowest in the OSI model.

However, most computers employ a technique in which only a few layers are present because the work of the session and presentation layers is minimal.

As a result, they can be combined with the Application Layer, as is done in the TCP/IP model, and the data link layer and physical layer are also combined as a single entity.

They use fewer layers, which reduces the number of times packets must travel from one layer to another, allowing for faster processing.

In addition, using a smaller number of layers may decrease costs since fewer devices are needed.

However, bundling multiple layers together might raise the strain on a single layer, which can cause the devices to overheat and make it difficult to deal with the resulting scenario in the long term.

In this case, fewer layers may be employed.

Still, their number can be reduced to a minimal number while simultaneously boosting the layer's administration of operations and tasks.

 

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