Question

On the other hand, the OSI model needs fewer layers in most computer systems. Why not use fewer layers? What are some of...


On the other hand, the OSI model needs fewer layers in most computer systems. Why not use fewer layers? What are some of the drawbacks of layering less?

Answer

This question discusses the ramifications of building a network with fewer layers.

The seven layers of the OSI are Physical, Data Link, Network, and Transport.

The remainder is made up of session/presentation/application layers.

Although most computers use this method, the session layer and presentation layer's work is minimized, enabling them to be merged with the application layer in the same manner as the TCP/IP model does, and the data connection layer and physical layer are likewise handled as a single unit.

Because there are fewer layers, they may be able to increase speed while lowering costs by decreasing the number of devices that must be deployed in the network.

Adding more layers to a single layer, on the other hand, increases the load on that layer, which may lead to overheating and make it difficult to resolve the problem later.

Although the number of layers engaged may be reduced, the amount of work and tasks performed by each layer will grow.

A computer is are machine that can be programmed to perform arithmetic or logical operations in a predetermined order.

Programs are general collections of operations that modern computers can do. 

These applications allow computers to a carry out a variety of activities.

A computer system is as a  "full" computer that comprises the necessary hardware, operating system (primary software), and peripheral devices for "full" functioning.

This phrase may also refer to a connected and cooperating set of computers, such as a computer network or a computer cluster.

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